L3 – 9.8 Weapon Retention Techniques

Weapon Retention Techniques

Weapon retention can be broken down into a few basic principles. They are awareness, prevention, maintaining distance, controlling the subject, knowing what to do if they attack your weapon, and then adhering to these principles. The retention principle focuses on keeping the weapon in the holster. This begins with a level of awareness before and during the initial encounter with a subject. Recognition of verbal and non-verbal cues that indicate a subject’s intentions of grabbing a weapon is a continuous process by the security officer. Having a proper stance and positioning relative to the subject will provide the security officer with a greater advantage to retain the weapon.

Prevention is another aspect of weapon retention, and the security officer should utilize the natural flinch response to keep the subject from even grabbing the weapon. Utilize parrying techniques to re-direct the subject’s arms while hollowing themselves out to create more space between them and the reaching hands of the subject. Once deflected, the security officer should follow the core principles and remain mobile and transitional.

I   Handgun

Handgun retention begins with adhering to the principles of maintaining distance, controlling the individual, knowing what to do if they attack your weapon, and then adhering to these principles. If the security officer does allow someone to enter the reactionary gap, they should immediately increase distance and tell the individual to stop moving in. If the individual continues into the security officer’s

personal space and attempts to put their hands on the security officer’s weapon, then the security officer should use a simple down check and increase the distance between themselves and the individual. If the individual actually does put their hands on the security officer’s weapon, then a simple retention technique should be used quickly to force them to let go of the weapon and to increase distance.

The retention techniques in this section all follow the same steps which are stabilizing the weapon platform, bringing the weapon to a position of power, making the subject release the weapon, increasing distance, and then following up.

a.   Holstered Retention

If the weapon is in the holster, then it needs to stay there if someone tries to take it. Following the principles outlined above, the most important thing is to not let the individual get close enough to the weapon to put their hands on it.

If they should put their hands on the holstered weapon, the security officer should immediately follow these steps that will allow them to retain their weapon.

  1. Stabilize the weapon platform. This is done by placing both hands on top of the individual’s hand and pushing the weapon down into the holster (Figure 9.30).

Figure 9.30: Stabilize weapon platform

1.1                Weapon Retention Techniques

Weapon retention can be broken down into a few basic principles. They are awareness, prevention, maintaining distance, controlling the subject, knowing what to do if they attack your weapon, and then adhering to these principles. The retention principle focuses on keeping the weapon in the holster. This begins with a level of awareness before and during the initial encounter with a subject. Recognition of verbal and non-verbal cues that indicate a subject’s intentions of grabbing a weapon is a continuous process by the security officer. Having a proper stance and positioning relative to the subject will provide the security officer with a greater advantage to retain the weapon.

Prevention is another aspect of weapon retention, and the security officer should utilize the natural flinch response to keep the subject from even grabbing the weapon. Utilize parrying techniques to re-direct the subject’s arms while hollowing themselves out to create more space between them and the reaching hands of the subject. Once deflected, the security officer should follow the core principles and remain mobile and transitional.

I        Handgun

Handgun retention begins with adhering to the principles of maintaining distance, controlling the individual, knowing what to do if they attack your weapon, and then adhering to these principles. If the security officer does allow someone to enter the reactionary gap, they should immediately increase distance and tell the individual to stop moving in. If the individual continues into the security officer’s

personal space and attempts to put their hands on the security officer’s weapon, then the security officer should use a simple down check and increase the distance between themselves and the individual. If the individual actually does put their hands on the security officer’s weapon, then a simple retention technique should be used quickly to force them to let go of the weapon and to increase distance.

The retention techniques in this section all follow the same steps which are stabilizing the weapon platform, bringing the weapon to a position of power, making the subject release the weapon, increasing distance, and then following up.

a.             Holstered Retention

If the weapon is in the holster, then it needs to stay there if someone tries to take it. Following the principles outlined above, the most important thing is to not let the individual get close enough to the weapon to put their hands on it.

If they should put their hands on the holstered weapon, the security officer should immediately follow these steps that will allow them to retain their weapon.

  1. Stabilize the weapon platform. This is done by placing both hands on top of the individual’s hand and pushing the weapon down into the holster (Figure 9.30).

Figure 9.30: Stabilize weapon platform

  1. Bring the weapon to a position of power by taking a step back with the strong side foot, making the individual extend their arms (Figure 9.31).

Figure 9.31: Stepping back into a position of power

Make the individual release the weapon. If the subject is in front of you then as soon as they have stepped back, you should release your support hand from the individual and use it to strike the top of the individual’s forearms with the bony portion of your forearm (Figure 9.32). When delivering this strike you should ensure that you drop your center of gravity in order to deliver this strike with force. If the individual doesn’t immediately let go of the weapon, you should deliver strikes to weaken the individual then strike the forearms again. If the individual is behind you, then you should release your strong hand from them and use it to strike the individual’s neck and then the forearms.

Figure 9.32: Striking forearm

  1. Follow up by increasing distance, making strikes, or utilizing a takedown (Figure 9.33).

Figure 9.33: Creating Space